Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.uca.edu.ar/handle/123456789/10350
Título : Anxiety, anger, salivary cortisol and cardiac autonomic activity in palliative care professionals with and without mind-body training experience : results from a pilot study
Autor : Iglesias, Silvia L. 
Azzara, Sergio 
Granchetti, Hugo 
Lagomarsino, Eduardo 
Vigo, Daniel Eduardo 
Palabras clave : ESTRESANSIEDADCUIDADOS PALIATIVOSCUIDADORESHIDROCORTISONAACTIVIDAD AUTONOMAPROMOCION DE LA SALUD
Fecha de publicación : 2014
Editorial : Elsevier
Cita : Iglesias, Silvia L., et al. Anxiety, anger, salivary cortisol and cardiac autonomic activity in palliative care professionals with and without mind-body training experience : results from a pilot study [en línea]. Postprint de artículo publicado en European Journal of Integrative Medicine. 2014, 6 (1). doi:10.1016/j.eujim.2013.11.004. Disponible en: https://repositorio.uca.edu.ar/handle/123456789/10350
Resumen : Abstract: Palliative care practitioners suffer a considerable burden of stress. Although it is not possible to eliminate stress entirely, people can learn to manage it. Mind/Body intervention help individuals turn maladaptive responses to stress into more adaptive ones. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of mind body techniques in a group of Palliative Care professionals. Methods: We investigated anxiety, anger, baseline salivary cortisol levels immediately after awakening and autonomic nervous system activity in a group of health care professionals from a Palliative Care Unit (n = 22). In addition, we assessed the autonomic response to relax instructions. The participants were divided into two groups according to their regular practice of mind-body techniques.Results: No significant differences between groups were found for anxiety and anger. Baseline salivary cortisol levels were significantly greater in the untrained group (5.23 ± 5.16 μg/dl) when compared with the trained one (0.57 ± 0.19 μg/dl) (Mann-Whitney U Test = 0; p < 0.001). When comparing heart rate variability (HRV) values during relaxation with HRV values at rest within each group, trained subjects showed a significant increase in LF% (z = -2.073, p = 0.038), while untrained subjects showed a significant increase in HF% (z = -2.100, p = 0.036). Conclusions: Subjects who regularly practice mind-body techniques evidenced lower baseline morning cortisol levels and achieved a differential autonomic response to relax instructions.
URI : https://repositorio.uca.edu.ar/handle/123456789/10350
ISSN : 1876-3820 (impreso)
1876-383 (online)
Disciplina: MEDICINA
DOI: 10.1016/j.eujim.2013.11.004
Derechos: Acceso abierto
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